busaba brunch
Hello, beloved readers. Brunch addict here again. This time…a little spicier.

I am an unapologetic creature of habit almost every weekend; come 11am, the craving for avocado and eggs hits and I flitter across the city to try one of my most recent brunch recommendations.

Occasionally, I break the mould and come out on top. This is what happened at Busaba Eathai.

Busaba recently launched brunch at their Shoreditch and newly refurbished Kingston Riverside sites (available from 10am to 3pm) and my lust for both thai food and indulgent brunches Spidey-sensed a potential win.

As you know, if it is on this blog it is most certainly a win. After ordering two Koh Samuis (made with coconut, carrot, and orange juice), my hungry companion and I ordered up a storm; coconut multi-grain porridge (served with sliced banana, ginger-spiced pineapple and chilli), baked eggs with spicy minced beef (a spicy melange of minced beef, red chilli, garlic, mushroom, cherry tomato, and eggs served with char-grilled toast), and Pad Thai with coconut rice (because I couldn’t help but suggesting it to my companion, Busaba Virgin).

Surrounded by what I assume is the the sole collection of palm trees in Shoreditch, I could not imagine a better place to spend a spicy Saturday or Sunday. Especially for recovery purposes (ahem).

busaba brunch
busaba brunch
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busaba eathai
Since coming back from Thailand, I feel like I have lost my left arm. Or left stomach. Or my right stomach.

No food cuts it like Thai food. Thankfully, Busaba Eathai exists. And so does their new Kinnaree Bar.

Pushing through a painful two weeks since our last Thai meal, The Manfriend and I hightailed our empty stomachs to Busaba’s flagship restaurant in Shoreditch for an evening of spicy indulgence.

Sitting down at one of their traditionally communal tables, we ended up ordering so much food that the seats either side of us were sacrificed as plate space.

After taking a few sips of our respective martinis (mine – the Lychee and kaffir lime martini, jasmine and kaffir lime infused vodka with lychee and lemon – was a sour yet floral delight), our dishes arrive like a hurricane.

Forgoing solo dishes for a spread to share, we kicked things off with fish cakes (with cucumber and peanut relish) and chicken satay with peanut sauce before meandering over to the larger plates: Sen Chan Pad Thai (rice noodle, king prawn, peanut, egg, green mango, and crabmeat), chilli prawn fried rice ( with shiitake mushroom, lime, and pickled morning glory), and Songkhla red curry

The latter – a dish which I had never tried before – was actually the surprise highlight; an aromatic concoction of slow-cooked beef, cherry tomato, banana pepper, and a perfect blend of sweet/salty/sour. My ultimate recommendation.

We did go down the spicy rote – especially with the addition of my beloved som tam (green papaya salad with dried shrimp, peanut, cherry tomato, and lime) – but I am pleased to report a plethora of happy faces from the sea of ‘no spice!’ customers seated around us.

In Thailand, they wouldn’t be so lucky.

Amazingly, we managed to eat ourselves silly and drink ourselves to almost believe we could clear our plates for less than £100, all in. It may not match up to home country pricing, but Busaba is the cheapest, freshest, and tastiest feast you’re going to find West of Thailand.

busaba eathai
busaba eathai
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