Victoria Vetri
Let’s throw this blog back to 1966 for the sake of Italian-American actress Victoria Vetri. Known by most as her stage name ‘Angela Dorian‘ (inspired by the ill-fated cruise liner Andrea Doria), the thing that really drew me to Vetri was not just her successful career, but the fact that she achieved it while turning down some incredible opportunities. Not many actresses today would turn down the chance to voice dub for Natalie Wood in West Side Story (1961) or play the nubile title role in Lolita (1962).

These screen caps – which have me lusting over a new trenchcoat – have been snapped from the TV show “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.“. In this episode (“The Indian Affairs Affair”) Victoria guest starred as Charisma Highcloud, the daughter of a Native American Chief. Feeling a black-haired Lana del Rey vibe, no?

Victoria Vetri
Victoria Vetri
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christmas with elvis
Thanks to a childhood soundtrack consisting mostly of The King, I have been an Elvis fan for as long as I have been an escapee of the womb. As a teenager I visited Graceland (his infamous home) and it was one of the most exciting experiences of my entire life. When I came upon these photos of Elvis and his wildly festive Christmas decorations, it was immediately locked in as this week’s Throwback Thursday.

Fun fact: Elvis would put gifts for Lisa Marie under the tree in the Jungle Room.

christmas with elvis
christmas with elvis
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new york worlds fair snow fight
Thanks to the The New York Public Library‘s brilliant digital gallery, this week’s Throwback Thursday has taken us back to a Winter Wonderland of 1939. These adorable photos were captured during a snow ball fight between employees of the New York World’s Fair. Mad props to the ladies doing it in heels.

And, because now is an appropriate time to throw it out into the universe: Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow (crosses fingers)…

new york worlds fair snow fight
new york worlds fair snow fight
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movie rejection letter
Though the state of the film industry is currently blockbuster-obsessed, things were far from sequels and heartbroken vampires in Essanay‘s heyday. Above, you are looking at the rejection slip that motion picture studio Essanay Film Manufacturing Company (1907-1925) used to send to screenwriters whose submissions didn’t make the cut (for any of the tickable reasons displayed). Essanay is best remembered for its series of Charlie Chaplin films, which – according to this – were stocked correctly, dramatic, easy to produce, interesting, and action-packed enough to make the grade.

Yours very truly,
Lela.

70s vw beetles
For the past three years, I haven’t been behind the wheel of a car. Having moved back to London after spending my late teen years in America, my need for a car became virtually non-existant (TFL, I HATE YOU. But I couldn’t live without you, xoxo).

The strange thing is, I love driving. My last car – a Volkswagen Beetle – had a lot to contribute to my love of driving. Next to a hot pink Lamborghini, it was my childhood dream. When I stumbled on these shots of a VW Beetle takeover on Copacabana Beach in the 1970s, I became rather motor-broody. As the 1972 Volkswagen commercial so infamously demonstrated, the Type 1 Beetle could float on water thanks to its sealed floor pans and tight construction, quickly making it a hippie/surfing icon.

Time to figure out how to justify a new car…

70s vw beetles
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