breakfast at tiffanys cast
I’m not messing around with this week’s Throwback Thursday. If you have ever seen (and therefore loved) Breakfast at Tiffany’s I doubt it took you more than a nanosecond to identify the photo above. Taken in June 1961, we have George Peppard and Audrey Hepburn with a few other castmates taking a break while on location in New York City. An iconic photograph.

vogue in space
I originally thought these photos were much older than they actually are: The Power of Fashion Photography. The photos come from a spread in the December 1999 issue of Russian Vogue, yet totally rock the 1960s retro theory thanks to one of Vogue’s most famous Brooklyn-born photographers, Arthur Elgort. Alongside cosmonauts of the Star City training centre we have gorgeous Russian model Natalia Semanova (channeling Milla Jovovich, no?).

vogue in space
vogue in space
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Moulin Rouge Garden
Thanks to Baz Luhrman, I often believe the Moulin Rouge to be a place where people sing their emotions on clouds and reinterpret Madonna’s greatest hits in hopes of saving their asses.

Then photos like this come along and remind me that the Moulin Rouge has existed long before Ewan McGregor became a penniless sitar player.

Co-founded in 1889 by Charles Zidler and Joseph Oller, these 100-year-old-plus photos depict my favourite part of Moulin Rouge’s legacy: the Garden. Where else in Paris could you get away with fashioning a giant red windmill and gargantuan elephant?

Moulin Rouge Garden

bellas hess catalog
Though I imagine the days of mail-order catalogs are well and truly over, the National Bellas Hess Catalog was at the top of its game in the 50s and 60s. Mailing our over 25 million catalogs a year with a typical return of over 250 million dollars, they were a sales force to be reckoned with. These scans from one of their 1955 catalogs might explain why: dresses for only $2.99? I’d take forty.

God, I can’t wait for the return of Mad Men…

bellas hess catalog
bellas hess catalog
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underground belly dancer
I love the London Underground. Though the insanity of rush hour could rustle anyone’s feathers, the Underground (or ‘Tube’) does a damn good job of keeping us Londoners entertained. Having travelled (sometimes begrudgingly) via the Metropolitan and Central line for the majority of the last 23 years, I have experienced and taken part in dance-offs, the sweet silence of morning commutes, giggled at the all-night train partiers of New Years, received marriage proposals, seen more than my fair share of late-night puking, assisted lost tourists, and relentlessly people-watched my way in and out of Central London.

I have yet to spot a belly dancer in full costume, but this throwback photo from 1968 has definitely put it on the bucket list.