christmas with elvis
Thanks to a childhood soundtrack consisting mostly of The King, I have been an Elvis fan for as long as I have been an escapee of the womb. As a teenager I visited Graceland (his infamous home) and it was one of the most exciting experiences of my entire life. When I came upon these photos of Elvis and his wildly festive Christmas decorations, it was immediately locked in as this week’s Throwback Thursday.

Fun fact: Elvis would put gifts for Lisa Marie under the tree in the Jungle Room.

christmas with elvis
christmas with elvis
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new york worlds fair snow fight
Thanks to the The New York Public Library‘s brilliant digital gallery, this week’s Throwback Thursday has taken us back to a Winter Wonderland of 1939. These adorable photos were captured during a snow ball fight between employees of the New York World’s Fair. Mad props to the ladies doing it in heels.

And, because now is an appropriate time to throw it out into the universe: Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow (crosses fingers)…

new york worlds fair snow fight
new york worlds fair snow fight
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movie rejection letter
Though the state of the film industry is currently blockbuster-obsessed, things were far from sequels and heartbroken vampires in Essanay‘s heyday. Above, you are looking at the rejection slip that motion picture studio Essanay Film Manufacturing Company (1907-1925) used to send to screenwriters whose submissions didn’t make the cut (for any of the tickable reasons displayed). Essanay is best remembered for its series of Charlie Chaplin films, which – according to this – were stocked correctly, dramatic, easy to produce, interesting, and action-packed enough to make the grade.

Yours very truly,
Lela.

paris 1914 moulin rouge
I really don’t make enough use of my close proximity to Paris. It seems that as each year in London flies by, the only time the French capital seems to cross my mind as a destination is when Fashion Week calls for it.

These photos are a guilt trip enough. Though the first commercially successful colour process – the Lumière Autochrome, invented by the French Lumière brothers – only reached the market in 1907, this small collection of colour photographs taken around Paris in 1914 are remarkable. Featuring the Moulin Rouge and the brink of the bohemian revolution, they incite something of a retrospective wanderlust.

paris 1914
paris 1914
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nyc subway stanley kubrick
If there was anyone made to catch the intimacy of New York City’s Subway crowd, it is Stanley Kubrick:
“I wanted to retain the mood of the subway, so I used natural light,” he said. “People who ride the subway late at night are less inhibited than those who ride by day. Couples make love openly, drunks sleep on the floor and other unusual activities take place late at night.”

To make pictures in the off-guard manner he wanted to, Kubrick rode the subway for two weeks. Half of his riding was done between midnight and six a.m. Regardless of what he saw, he couldn’t shoot until the car stopped in a station because of the motion and vibration of the moving train. Often, just as he was ready to shoot, someone walked in front of the camera, or his subject left the train.

I think I have to do a modern-day version of this.



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