Phytonectar Shampoo
Though I’ve been pleased with the results of all my trialled products from haircare brand Phyto, nothing stands out quite as much as their “Phytonectar“. True to their branding, Patrick Alès‘ vision of creating plant-based and environmentally-conscious hair products has tricked down to create yet another powerful botanical remedy. Phytonectar is a hydrating shampoo for dry and over-processed hair (check, check, for me!) with medium-to-course texture (check, tick, yes, yes, YES!).

The product itself is a super-thick emulsion, enriched with orange blossom wax and St. John’s Wort (20%), which gently cleanses and revives even the most dehydrated, brittle hair. As it is a natural product, it comes without parabens, synthetic dyes, petrochemicals, and phthalates. This means while the shampoo doesn’t have the “lather” that chemical-filled shampoos trick us into believing means “clean hair“, it is filled with the most incredible, nourishing, and natural hair helpers.

If you want soft, frizz-free, and (most importantly) healthy hair, dump the sudsy shampoos and grab a bottle of Phytonectar.

heart pool

For about one week, The Manfriend and I have been living in what finally feels like a permanent residence. To recap, in the past 365 days I have moved from a bedroom rental, to Manfriend’s bedroom rental, to a few hotels, to an entire floor of a Thailand apartment building, to Manfriend’s mom’s house, to a flat above the great British high street. 365 days. Now, we’ve found our way into having our names legally attached to a house.

A cozy house, a “home“, with our own, separate offices and a room for our babies (WHO COME HOME FROM QUARANTINE IN NINE DAYS!!). As it is a rental, we can’t jam any (new) holes into the wall, paint, or knock any walls out, but we are beyond ready to invest in some great pieces to decorate.

As my organisation techniques are spurred by visual aides, I have created a mini “Interior Design” photo bomb to share some of my ideas and inspiration with you, thus far. Manfriend and I have quite similar aesthetic attitudes (which is a blessing, let’s be real); clean lines, shots of colour in neutral tones, lots of texture, quirky pieces of furniture, and non-traditional art. We’ve also agreed that it’s about time we invest in some luxury bedroom furniture.

…it’s going to be an extraordinarily fun creative process, I think. One with some very tight purse strings, and a lot of innovation to be called upon!

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Bora Aksu SS12
Welcome to Spring/Summer 2012 at London Fashion Week! First off, Bora Aksu. The collection, “The Unknown”, was inspired by five handwritten Edwardian postcards, and kicked off exactly in that light; heavy violins and strobe lighting for a minute for a minute or two, then a rise of the lights that presented a group of models in garments that were obviously inspired by the early 1900s – hooped underskirts, thick pleating, and gorgeous layers of silk.

Every piece came out with a raw, opulent feel, with serious attention to detail and wild texture. To top it off, every leg in the show was covered with striking tights that were partially comprised of fishnet material, and partially of lyrca. The tights created a spider web effect that spiralled around their legs, and added a seductive feel to the otherwise prim silhouettes. View Post

Roberto Cavalli Ad

Roberto Cavalli - Click to Enlarge!


Roberto Cavalli does Italian glamour with an edge. When Brigitte Bardot helped launch his career in the Seventies, his aesthetic was sold as interesting, dark flamboyance. When I think of the talented designer’s best pieces, I see texture, movement and sexuality that I have attempted to portray in the ad above.

Thank you for all your wonderful feedback for Fashion Spot thus far! It is definitely a highlight of my blogging week. As a gift, I give you Roberto Cavalli – in denim on denim – riding a Segway in Cannes this past week. Homeslice is 70.
Roberto Cavalli Segway
Don’t forget to enter to win your dream shoes here!

Basso and Brooke LFW Runway
The Hungover Editors missed a Day Three treat, as the duo of Basso and Brooke switched from their sometimes headache-inducing designs to a collection full of classic shapes adorned with more complimentary prints. You know, the type of garments that will make a designer’s wallet bust.

The actual prints referenced city maps, Da Vinci’s handwriting, Tolstoy, architecture, botany and coral branches, all in soft pastels and slightly off-standard colours. Everything was texture terrific; gathering, folding, embossing – Basso and Brooke had it all. Structured, yet entirely languid – completely underrated. View Post