Dressing Room
Most people – myself included – abhor trying clothes on. According to The Wall Street Journal, this saves us money; studies from retailt consultant Envision Retail have shown that stepping into the rooms makes someone fifty-seven percent more likely to purchase something. In response, stores have now switched gears towards making dressing rooms more appealing by:

Giving the men/kids somewhere to wait

So boyfriends, husbands, and kids don’t cause a distraction, Macy’s Inc. has been gradually updating its stores to add communal waiting spots with flat-screen TVs – tuned to either sports or cartoons – and upholstered seating.

Expanding Dressing Rooms

Anthropologie – a division of Urban Outfitters – makes sure each room can accommodate more than one person. “[Women] consider it a little bit of a party,” says Co-President Wendy B. McDevitt.

Making Dressing Rooms a focal point

Currently, stores have about 20% of square footage left for fitting rooms and storage after 80% is taken by displaying the merchandise. Stores are now being lobbied to dedicate more space to their fitting rooms, as it is where decisions are primarily made.

Making Flattering Lighting a Priority

New Ann Taylor fitting rooms have six sources of lighting and three types of bulbs, compared to one source and type of lighting in the old design. The mixture of ceramic metal halide, compact fluorescent and low-voltage bulbs is more flattering (no place to discover hidden lumps and bumps!)