This has been an exceptionally weird Pride month.

With all that has been going on, Pride has felt as notable as it has non-existent. More invisible — and important — than ever.

It’s been a rainbow-coloured rollercoaster. One day, the Supreme Court would finally agree to protect the rights of LGBTQ+ people in the workplace. The next, JK Rowling would try to EVANESCO trans women altogether (yes, that is the incantation from Potter’s vanishing spell and I’m #notsorry).

But she didn’t stop there. As the so-called ‘trans row’ gained steam, Rowling decided to explain transphobic comments with a transphobic blog. Then, today, delete personal praise for Stephen King after he tweeted ‘Trans women are women’. All in the name of feminism.

(Because, as impenetrable as her arguments are, trans women are apparently threatening to the ‘sex rights’ of cisgendered, heterosexual, white women?)

Honestly, enough is enough.

While I don’t intend on singling Rowling out as the beacon of all that is transphobic, it has to be reiterated — the baseline of all feminism is equality.

Equality which, in the most basic of definitions, would ensure that a specific aspect of a person’s identity (like gender, sexuality, or skin colour) would have no effect on their treatment or opportunities.

That we’re all seen as people.

To believe in equality yet question the sanity, intentions, or existence of a person for not hiding such an aspect is clearly wrong — and in this case, transphobic.

Women, as a collective, do not share a singular experience. Nor do ‘straight people’, ‘tall people’, ‘English people’, ‘trans people’ (etcetera, etcetera). These are labels society has presented us with. Labels we’re either happy or complicit to adopt.

At best, people who share a label may also share a handful of similarities. The rest, whether it’s good or bad, is individual.

The fact is, calling trans women what they are — women — has zero impact on me (a cisgender bisexual woman), Rowling (who continues to restrict the construct of womanhood to “people with vaginas”), or anyone else on the outskirts of trans-ness, but it has an enormous impact on those women.

Just as the slow-but-sure acceptance and advancement of cis women, black women, gay women and more has done for the rest of us.

We are born and bred to be an alliance.

As marginalized groups go, trans people have been dealt an impossible hand; they face daily discrimination and harassment, societal demands that they “pass” for their gender, ridicule around their “transition” (or lack thereof), and HIGH-PROFILE REMINDERS THAT THEY ARE NOT WOMEN BECAUSE WOMEN HAVE ALWAYS FACED DAILY DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT.

I’m going to let that one sink in for a second.

The TERFs can’t rationalize this — weaponizing cis trauma to justify trans trauma. They are so clearly connected, so clearly a manifestation of the misogyny and gender roles that wreak havoc on us all (and the same, in reverse, for all men).

There is no room for people to rest on their laurels (or ignorance, or paranoia) here. The rhetoric has to change.

Do your homework (TransEDU is a goldmine), do your documentary diving (Netflix’s Disclosure is a fantastic place to start), and approach these conversations with the attitude you’d want from someone judging you.

Nobody is equal until everyone is equal.

** Artwork from the cover of An Illustrated Oral History of Queer and Trans Resistance **

Thylane Blondeau
Thylane Lena-Rose Blondeau is one of the the very few young-and-stunning ‘model sensations’ set to make an enormous name for herself. The thing is, she’s 10 years old. Born in the Ivory Coast in 2001, it seems she was genetically blessed with a quintessential ‘model face‘ – something extraordinarily reminiscent of Brigitte Bardot and Lou Doillon.

With such an extensive portfolio already in place as the incredibly young model hit double-digits, Thylane has been the center of both awe and controversy. While her prominent beauty is of no argument, the fact that she has been styled “seductively” in some shoots makes me uncomfortable. While a woman’s right to her sexuality is completely her choice, she is in no way close to being a woman. I believe this young girl has, to be cliche, a face that could launch a thousand ships. When these tiny beauties are still years away from puberty, though, let those of us in the industry keep them modelling as children and children only.

I wish her a safe and wonderful career ahead.

The Industry London
After five years of business, last week marked the beginning of Fashion Business Club‘s new reign as “The Industry“. Though it has been fully rebranded, the purpose remains the same: a members only group of industry insiders with networking on the mind.

Kate Nash

Kate Nash


What better way to kick off the first meeting than with Rebekah Roy (fashion stylist who has worked with everyone from Erin O’Connor to Kate Moss) interviewing super-songstress Kate Nash (who showed up in my dream pair of Terry de Havilland heels).

During the meeting, Kate spoke not only about her style, but about the overall perception and image of women in the music industry. With packaged pop stars usually ‘forced’ to look a certain way, Nash spoke of the frustration that lies with younger girls telling her that they can’t be a popstar without (a false notion of) beauty. The London-raised musician isn’t interested in the exploitation of her sexuality, and thankfully experiences a sort of entitlement to dress the way her mood steers her because of a sexist reality: she is a woman who writes her own music.

Kate Nash Fashion Stylist

Rebekah Roy and Kate Nash


It was an intriguing and inspiring way to kick off the new era of The Industry. You will be able to see the interview next week, exclusively, on Harper’s Bazaar UK.

Sogno di Donna Vogue Italia
You’ve already seen the cover, so sit tight for some beautiful – and NSFW – photos from Vogue Italia‘s full “Sogno di donna” spread. No pun intended.

While this is a gorgeous ‘starting line’ for the hope to incorporate fuller-figured models into mainstream fashion, I really look forward to seeing similar efforts put into more contemporary spreads. Curvy does not always need to equate with excess (ie. food, sexuality). View Post